The whole thing kills me and then the music drops out and it’s just Casey singing “Is this my weakness?” and I just CRUMBLE. 

Full House is absolutely perfect when Michelle is just a figment of Danny Tanner’s imagination.

Lol fantasy. 

Lol fantasy. 

Peek-a-boo.

Peek-a-boo.

(via jeskeets)

soulfulsock:

Batmane

Holy ice cream tat, Batmane!

soulfulsock:

Batmane

Holy ice cream tat, Batmane!

(via zachwkelly)

Sorry/not sorry about the Mets hat.

togatherinc:

The next in our series of Togather team book reports comes from Client Services Coordinator Michael Mannheimer, who read Pauls Toutonghi’s Evel Knievel Days.  Pauls is based in Portland, but has upcoming travel dates all over the west and midwest this summer. Maybe he wouldn’t mind stopping by a bar or bookstore in your town — why not ask

It’s been a while since I read a novel that I really connected with, but the main character of Paul Toutonghi’s second novel Evel Knievel Days and I have a lot in common: we’re both slightly OCD, passionate about playing the right old country song on the dive bar jukebox (everything is always OK with Patsy Cline by your side), and constanIy overwhelmed by our FEELINGS. Evel Knievel Days tells the story of Khosi Saqr, a nervous kid with a voracious imagination who is just a little too smart for his small town upbringing. Khosi lives with his single mother in Butte, Montana, a tiny mining town known mostly for being the birthplace of the daredevil biker whose namesake festival gives the book its title. Khosi eventually works up the courage to travel to Egypt in search of his long-lost father, but the book isn’t a coming of age novel as much as it’s about how a city, a physical place, can shape your identity.
I love how Toutonghi constantly keeps you guessing where Khosi will end up. His descriptions of earthy, rustic Montana and the bustling city of Cairo make you feel like you’re right there with our hero, tagging behind him as he navigates narrow streets and greets tourists as the guide of the Copper King Mansion. It’s also a great book for anyone who really obsesses over food—Khosi’s mother, Amy Clark, is the best Egyptian chef in town, and her cooking is sometimes the only thing keeping these characters from falling apart. 

Part ghost story, part loving tribute to baklava and creme brûlée, Evel Knievel Days is the rare book that makes you thirst for your hometown, wherever that may be. I can’t wait to see what Toutonghi comes up with next. 

Abner Jay, “Lord Randal”

This song absolutely kiiiillllllsss me. Finally picked up this incredible Mississippi Records comp of Jay’s recordings from 1964-1973, and though he’s often touted as one of the great traveling one man bands, this record has a gospel track and a rambling pop song about a submarine. Essential. 

Rest in peace, Jet.

Like Annie Clark singing over a Washed Out track, only good.

Mama, there goes that man!

Mama, there goes that man!